Tag Archives: hobbyists

Model Fun Day!

This Saturday Caryn hosted a little hobby get together. We all brought projects and hung out talking horses. It was pretty much the best thing ever. I got a ton of prepping done, Tracy painted medallions, Erin made saddle parts, and Caryn worked on customs and props.

Caryn working on her stablemate Arabian. Also pictured: delicious treats, mimosa, paint, ponies.

Caryn working on her stablemate Arabian. Also pictured: delicious treats, mimosa, paint, ponies.

Caryn was an amazing hostess, providing a veritable feast that kept us happily stuffed all day. Then she sent us home with chicken pot pies and cookies! We’re hoping to do more of these little get-togethers, but no one is gonna top this one for foodstuffs!

I got a ton done at Caryn’s, and then woke up today super motivated. I’ve got my resins and commissions in the works as well as a present for my trainer and a donation for NAN. There’s quite the herd in my In Progress cabinet. I hope to start putting color on them soon, and posting pictures of course!

Projects drying under the heat lamp

Projects drying under the heat lamp

Meanwhile, I still have photos from NW Congress to post (bored yet?). At the show I was lamenting that I couldn’t take enough photos, but processing and posting them all makes me feel somewhat differently :P Without further ado, here’s some of the pretties from the AR Mini division. Enjoy!

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Great Painting Tip from Jamie Baker

Jamie Baker is a great model horse artist, and is always very generous with sharing her techniques. She shared a brilliant (and so simple!) technique on Blab that I definitely plan to use.

Jamie Baker tip screenshot

This idea is a cool compatriot for another tip from Blab about visualizing colors, which I posted about previously.

Have I mentioned I can’t wait to start painting again?

This post needed a picture. Check out the butt on this gorgeous guy!

This post needed a picture. Check out the butt on this gorgeous guy! I know it’s the angle but… dayum. Cool reference for the pangare, too.

Tiny Things

My Christmas gift portrait cob now has hair! Said hair needs work, but she looks a lot better than last month when she had no ears and a wire sticking out of her butt…

Kettil Blacksmith is still in the pony hospital, but he’s recovering from Brokentailitis and will hopefully be ready to hit the show ring in a few weeks.

Progress!

Meanwhile, awesome hobby bloggers are busy making tiny masterpieces. EG of Last Alliance Studios cooked up some delicious looking sandwiches and Nichelle of Desktop Stables made a whole library of wee books. Seriously, the first pictures in these two posts will give you a real double take.

Play-Doh is Fun Again

Sara Gifford of FriesianFury Studio did a lovely blog post about using Play-Doh way back in February, but I didn’t have a reason to try it until recently. My resin drafter has a nifty little acrylic rod in his hoof to help him stand, and I needed to protect it from primer.

So off I went to the store to get some play-doh. At first I only found the big packs with many different colors, but then I found this handy zip pack for only $1.99.

I took a little piece of play-doh (man, even this small bag is going to last me forever) and smooshed it over the acrylic peg so it was completely covered. Then I primed him like normal.

After I was done priming, I simply pulled off the play-doh, with the acrylic rod safe and sound and clean.

I won’t have a frequent use for play-doh, but I’m really glad I got some. It’s one of those tools that is the perfect choice when you need it- you just don’t need it very often. But I’ll definitely never struggle with painter’s tape again. Those days are over!

Thanks for the great post, Sara!

Thoughts on Commissions

When I re-entered the model horse hobby in late 2009, I made myself a promise that I would emphasize the crafty, do-it-yourself side of the hobby and participate for my own enjoyment and creative exercise. I wanted to maintain the hobby as a personal activity that combined my love of making things with my love of horses.

There was a time when I believed that I would never accept commissions, even if and when I reached such a skill level. I liked the idea of my work being valued by other hobbyists, but I viewed commissions as a chore that some people strangely chose to shackle themselves to.

My first commission

I couldn’t imagine having deadlines for customers who wanted to take a horse to this show or that, or needing to follow a specific reference strictly to the last detail. Forcing myself to work on a horse would have been the antithesis of my hobby goals. My works always evolve as I go along, and I never wanted to have a customer’s desire override my preference as the artist.

My feelings and impressions about commissions have changed, particularly in response to another one of my hobby-promises: that I would keep spending to a minimum, and only buy the supplies I needed to make things myself. I keep that promise still, but it doesn’t stop me from wanting what I consider out of my price range, such as unpainted artist resins.

My second commission, nearly finished

I recently started my third commission, as a trade for a beautiful draft resin I’ve long admired. What I’ve found is that commissions don’t have to be chores or fetters. They can be inspiring and exciting. Each commission trade has been the result of collaborative design and agreement between myself and the customer, with flexibility reserved for me in terms of both time and creation.

The customer’s vision is an impetus for me to create something new, something that perhaps I would not have envisioned myself. And because I maintain the freedom for that work to evolve, I keep the promise to myself to do this for enjoyment and fun.

It is lovely to have my work respected and wanted by others, but even more thrilling to collaborate with another hobbyist on a trade that makes both sides so happy and satisfied.

How They See Us

Check out this great post from FriesianFury Studio from the point of view of one of her model victims!

Living with a Customizing Serial Killer

I can’t wait to see the final results.

Adding an Acrylic Peg for Stability

If you have a model who only has a few hooves on the ground or is simply unbalanced, they might need a stand or peg as support. A horse with only one or two hooves touching the ground usually needs the added security of a base, like my Shetland pony work in progress:

Often, an acrylic rod is used when the horse has a hoof that nearly touches the ground, but not quite, and needs to for stability. Many people prefer acrylic rods to bases because they are less obtrusive and often make the horse easier to show.

My new resin, Linda York’s “Roll” has been having some tippiness issues. As I get closer to priming him, it’s becoming more and more important that he can stand upright safely- I won’t be able to prime or fixative him if he needs to be lying down all the time!

This resin has three hooves on the ground and another slightly raised, so he’s a perfect candidate for an added acrylic rod.

I believe you can buy acrylic rods in various sizes from hobby and craft stores, but another excellent source is hobbyist Myla Pearce, who sells them in various sizes through the Model Horse Sales Pages. In this instance I’m using her smallest size, 1/16″, which she recommends for Stablemate leg supports.

The first step is to drill a hole in the hoof where the rod will go. You want to drill a straight, deep hole without punching through the other side of the hoof. I chose a diamond drill bit only slightly larger than my acrylic rod.

Happily, I managed to drill neatly and straightly up into the hoof, making a perfect little nest for the rod.

Then I simply inserted a piece of the cut rod into the hole. Once I had it cut to roughly the correct size, I pulled it out, set in just a drop of super glue, and replaced the rod.

As you can see, the rod wasn’t the exact right length. It’s extra height is lifting his near fore leg off the ground. This is easily remedied, however, and easier than trying to cut the exact right size before gluing. Once the glue is completely dry, simply use a needle file to incrementally shorten the acrylic rod until you reach the correct height.

Voila! A happy, stable horse ready for primer and beyond.