Tag Archives: restoration

Repairing Damaged Finish

Unfortunately, one of the wounded from last week’s Great Feline Attack was Rumble Strip, the star of my recently finished racehorse diorama. Not only did he break off from his acrylic rod and the diorama base, but he also suffered some damage to his finish.

I am not confident using acrylics to paint a whole model or really achieve any shading, but at least I can do some discrete color matching to fix these boo-boos.

First I identified which brown shades would go into his repair. Then I set about mixing and matching colors to find which matched his damaged spots. The nice thing about acrylics is that you can remove them from the horse with water and a cloth or paper towel if the color doesn’t work- as long as you do it right away. So I could mix a color and test it on a spot without doing further damage to the original finish work.

I needed some darker colors to mix the right shades and to fix the marred spot on his tail. It worked, although I squeezed the bottle of Charcoal a bit too hard…

Happily, it didn’t take too long to fix up the damage. He certainly isn’t LSQ, but he wasn’t before either- and now he’s back to his lovely presentable self.

Attaching him back onto the base was relatively easy. All I needed was super glue with a fine tip and a bit of patience. It’s not as neat as before, but I might be able to file down some of the excess glue- once I’m positive that it’s thoroughly dry. And now the race horses are back on the shelf where they belong.

Alas, the other repairs will not be quite as simple.

Sierra Roana Reborn

Finally after a year of sitting in disrepair, Sierra Roana is once again on her feet- well, two of them anyway!

This was her sad state for too long:

Oy, my legs!

Until today!

I have finally managed to finish her repair, complete with acrylic rod, newly sculpted fetlocks and hooves, color matching on her belly, and a new base. Now she is back on the shelf and ready to get a new show picture (or two!)

But one more thing…

I am very picky about my horse’s names, and if I don’t like the name I will start to dislike the horse. Sierra Roana has proven too fancy a name for this feisty little mare. I’m shopping for a new one, but torn between several options. Which name do you think suits her best?

Take Two: a partial armature

From last post: “She looks funny now…but with some careful filing and sanding, those will hopefully start to look like fetlocks, pasterns, and hooves.” Emphasis added.

When I started to file and sculpt down the blobs of last post into new hooves for Sierra Roana, one of them broke right off, leaving her the original pewter stump. The other seems solid, but for stability in the broken leg I needed to do something more drastic.

I filed down her cannon bone to very thin pewter, and then used super glue to attach a thin wire all the way up the leg and out the bottom. This armature acts as a base for a sculpted pastern and hoof. The super glue, as well as epoxy sculpture over the wire, holds it firmly in place.

So now I’m back to the careful resculpting of both hooves in preparation for an acrylic rod and permanent base. I’m going slowly and letting each new bit of epoxy dry before I add to it so that I build up the desired shape slowly and avoid destroying my hard work by pushing it. Just a few minutes a day and now once again she’s looking like a four legged creature.

Repairing Sierra Roana

One of my most accomplished show horses is Sierra Roana, my Maggie Bennett Rearing Horse. Unfortunately, because of her cool action pose and her material (pewter) she broke at the rear fetlocks earlier this year.

I had attempted to repair her once before, by putting an acrylic rod in her belly and down into her base. But that was really difficult to do properly- I wanted to get her back into her original dynamic pose, and the repair was made even more difficult because I had to line up her cannons properly with her broken fetlocks.

This time I had two new ideas for a full restoration. One, I wanted to insert the acrylic rod further into her body for increased stability. And two, I decided to just sculpt new fetlocks and hooves for her instead of trying to match up her two halves properly while attaching the acrylic rod.

The fact that Maggie Bennett’s micro minis are cast in pewter makes them wonderfully affordable, but unfortunately it’s difficult to make holes in. (Easy to prep, though, for anyone interested). I made a hole in her belly using my carbide scraper. But unlike a dremeled hole, its not very exact or straight or perfectly round. That makes for more restorative sculpting and pastelling later, but it was a necessary evil to attach the acrylic rod.

But before I do that, she needed new feet. Straight epoxy won’t stick to the broken pewter and it’s two small to insert wire armatures, so I made super glue and baking soda lumps on the bottoms of her cannons.

She looks funny now (especially with her protective cellophane coat) but with some careful filing and sanding, those will hopefully start to look like fetlocks, pasterns, and hooves.

Once her pedicure is done it’ll be time to insert the acrylic rod, restore the color on her belly and feet, and plant her in a new base. And then I can take a better halter photo and start her exciting career as a bareback bronc.

Thrift Store Rescue

I went to Goodwill yesterday to get a few things for the house and I found a new friend that I needed to adopt and rehabilitate.

Observe teh blurry cuteness

As you can see he’s had a bit of a rough life- he’s missing an ear, has a few big chunks out of his mane, and a piece of his knee is missing. He needs my help!

How could you refuse that face?

First thing to do was wash off all that dust and scrub him with a toothbrush. Then,  because he has lovely glass eyes, I needed to protect them from paint and epoxy while I worked on the rest of him. So I covered them in masking tape, which makes him look super creepy.

Eerie, no?

Then I used baking soda and super glue to rebuild part of the missing ear, which I can then build on with epoxy.

His new ear armature

Coming up… new ear, repaired chips, and a new coat of paint.